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Pulp British Trains

Page history last edited by Michael 10 months, 4 weeks ago

back to the Index or the Land Transportation page

 


Fares

 

     Except on a few of the "boat trains" to the Continent, the only classes on British trains are first and third. Standard fares are at the rate of 2-1/2d per mile in first class, and 1-1/2d per mile in third class.

     Travel by Pullman cars, or in sleepers, will involve a supplemental fare.

     The usual tip for railway porters (moving baggage between the curb and the train) is 6d, or more if there's a lot of baggage, or a long wait; tips aren't usual elsewhere on trains. A good tipper, remembered for his or her generosity, might provide a shilling or even a half-crown or florin.

 

Routes

 

     We have a page on rail/ferry travel between London and Paris

     There's information on a London-to-Rome train, as well.

 

Approaches to London

 

     All four main line railways (Great Western; London, Midland and Scottish; London and North-Eastern; Southern) run to London, which is quickly and conveniently reached by express trains from all parts of the country. Special boat-trains operate from the principal ports to the London termini in connection with the arrival of cross-Channel and ocean steamships, as indicated below:

 

  • Dover to Victoria Station, by Southern Railway:  77-1/2 miles in about 2-3/4 hours. This is the route of "through" Paris-London trains, conveyed from Dunkerque by Channel ferry and consisting of sleeping-cars of the Wagons-Lits Company.

  • Fishguard to Paddington Station, by Great Western Railway:  269 miles in about 6 hours.

  • Folkestone to Victoria Station, by Southern Railway:  73 miles in about 2 hours 20 minutes. This is mostly the route for passengers arriving from Boulogne, France.

  • Gravesend to Victoria Station, by Southern Railway:  27-1/2 miles in about 45 minutes.

  • Harwich to Liverpool Street Station, by London and North-Eastern Railway:  71 miles in about 2 hours.

  • Holyhead to Euston Station, by London, Midland and Scottish Railway:  263-1/2 miles in about 5-1/2 hours.

  • Liverpool to Euston Station, by London, Midland and Scottish Railway:  201 miles in about 4 hours.

  • Newcastle to King's Cross Station, by London and North-Eastern Railway:  268 miles in 5-3/4 hours, or 4 hours by "Silver Jubilee" express.

  • Newhaven to Victoria Station, by Southern Railway:  56 miles in about 1-1/2 hours.

  • Plymouth to Paddington Station, by Great Western Railway:  226-1/2 miles in about 5 hours.

  • Southampton to Waterloo Station, by Southern Railway:  78-1/2 miles in about 1-3/4 hours.

  • Tilbury to St Pancras Station, by London, Midland, and Scottish Railway:  about 25 miles in about 1 hour.

 

     Besides the above routes from sea-ports, a few other routes are worth mentioning here:

 

  • Edinburgh to London, by London, Midland and Scottish Railway:  about 537 miles in about 9 hours, between Princes Street Station and Euston Station. Trains every hour or two. First class fare £5 12s, plus £1 for Pullman or sleeping-car supplement for overnight trips.

  • Edinburgh to London, by London and North-Eastern Railway:  393 miles in about 9 hours, between Waverly Station and King's Cross Station. Trains every couple of hours. First class fare £4 2s, plus £1 for Pullman or sleeping-car supplement for overnight trips.

    • Berwick-on-Tweed is 58 miles (almost an hour) "towards London" from Edinburgh along the LNER lines. Eight or more main-line trains stop here each day. One express each day stops at Beal, the closest station to the Holy Isle; a few minor, local passenger trains from Berwick also call at Beal.

 

London Stations

 

     Travelers arriving by ocean liner in Britain at Southampton will travel on the boat train, which arrives at Waterloo Station after a journey of about an hour and a half, or two hours. Those who arrive on a cross-Channel steamer and land at Dover, Folkestone or one of the other channel ports will have a trip of similar length, arriving at Victoria Station -- unless you land at Harwich, in which case you will arrive in London at Liverpool Station; or if you arrive via Tilbury, in which case you will arrive at St. Pancras. 

     Information on where to stay, in Britain or on the Continent; advice on which trains (or aircraft, etc.) is available in the big main-line stations from the Continental Inquiry Office.

     The baggage porters, taxi-drivers, ticket-sellers, etc. often speak with thick Cockney accents, "with regard to whose musical qualities opinions are sharply divided"; they will direct persons to the inquiry office or elsewhere.

 

Sources

 

  • Bradshaw's General Railway, Steam Navigation, & Hotel Guide (October 1936)

  • Bradshaw's Continental Guide (May 1937)

  • London and its Environs, pub. Karl Baedeker, 1930

  • 1936 ... On The Continent, ed. by Eugene Fodor, pub. (facsimile) 1985 by Hodder and Stoughton, London

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