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Morrow Project Field Gear

Page history last edited by Michael 1 month ago

back to the Index or the Equipment Data page or the Imagery page

 

 



 

Aid Bag

 

     Typically a vehicle "installed" item. Known in the military as the "#3 aid bag", it's a fabric bag with three zippered pockets. It contains a minor surgical field instrument set, EMT shears, 24 field dressings (0.1 kg each), compresses, gauze, band-aids, sunburn cream, two tourniquets, a splint, and other minor stuff. Weight, about 4 kg.

    • Game effects:   the use of First Aid skill allows this set to be used for the treatment of 12 minor or major wounds. It's not much use in case of amputations or massive blood loss.

 

Aircrew Uniform Integrated Battlefield

 

 

     Known as the AUIB, this coat and trousers combines chemical protection with flame retardancy (the outer layer is nomex). The coat has integrated pass-throughs to accommodate hoses for a microclimate cooling vest (not issued for the Project, or even for the US military before 1993). Tan or sage green color, size are S, M, L, or XL; the jacket has no hood, but the jacket and trousers have pockets. Note this gear gradually loses its protective qualities if laundered or immersed in water -- it's "done" after ten launderings. Comes sealed in a zippered plastic bag. Weight 2.5 kilograms.

 

Ammunition Carrying Bag

 

 

     Green canvas, with flap and shoulder strap. In the US Army, this was the "M1 general purpose ammunition bag"; the Project issues these for carrying ammunition, holding empty magazines (aka "dump pouch" or "retention pouch"), and as forage bags. Some role kits receive claymore bags instead. It's about 30 cm tall, 20 cm wide and 13 cm deep; a "30 cal ammo can" will just fit inside (if you take out the divider). 0.45 kg.

 

B Rations

 

     Intended for Project personnel who need to spend weeks or months in a base, depot, bunker, etc. with minimal food preparation equipment and no refrigerator or freezer; the normal Ration Pack (i.e., LRP rations) is not appropriate for long-term consumption. The bulk of the ration is commercial canned foods, and some dehydrated components, to provide three meals a day (at least 3200 calories). Weight including containers, packaging, etc. is 1.7 kg per person-day; a heavy-duty cardboard box (with reinforced bottom) of 30 person-days has a mass of 51 kilograms, and a volume of 0.1 cubic meters.

    • While not part of the B Ration issue, rolls of institutional toilet paper would be provided at the rate of 1 roll per person-week. Toilet paper is shipped in cardboard boxes containing 96 rolls (the minimum issue, presumably), with a mass of 22 kilograms and a volume of  0.15 cubic meters.

 

Beverage Pack

 

     Intended mostly to overcome the taste of chemically-treated drinking water. A case contains 660 packets of fruit-flavored beverage powder, instant tea, lemon-flavored instant tea, and sugar (only 15 packets) to make 660 cups of "beverage"; the cardboard case weighs 30 kilograms, and has a volume of 0.1 cubic meters.

 

Bipod, M2

 

 

     An item which can be clamped onto M14 or M21 rifles -- it can't be used on the Stoner weapons. The legs fold back, and can each be adjusted about 10 cm in length. Weight 0.8 kg.

 

Canteen

 

     A green plastic 1-liter canteen, with insulated cover and metal canteen cup; it weighs 0.4 kg empty, or of course 1.4 kg filled with water. The survival gear kit includes an adapter cap, to be used with the normal military gas mask for drinking without un-masking -- the M25A1 mask doesn't work that way, however.

 

Chainsaw, Electric

 

     Has a 46 cm blade, automatic chain oiler, chain cover. Not really as powerful as a gasoline-powered saw of the same size. 8.8 kg, 45 liters volume when stored. Power 1800 watts, fed by a Morrow Project vehicle battery, which will run it at full power for 50 minutes.

 

Chemical Protective Overgarment

 

 

     Similar to the AUIB issued to Recon teams, this item is found in some caches, and is definitely present in depots. The usual abbreviation is CPOG. It's part of the standard US Army protective gear for the 1980s:  a pair of pants, and a hooded jacket,  both meant to be worn over other clothing. Once removed from the sealed bag, they're fully effective for 14 days (or until they get too wet). Color is olive drab; weight in medium sizes is about 3 kg.

 

Contact Pack

 

contact pack - mass about 16 kg depending on weapon

1

floppy, felt crusher hat, in various drab colors

1

bandana neckerchief, usually red

1

denim jacket

1

pair blue jeans

2

cotton flannel plaid work shirts

1

pair Kastinger hiking boots

1

leather belt

4

pairs heavy wool socks

1

nylon Jansport pack, containing 4 candles, 40 m twine, 6 cans of food, 3 pairs of underwear, 2 undershirts, 12 ounce (0.35 liter) flask of Scotch, other assorted survival and personal items, 10 silver "Peace dollars"

1

leather bandolier, with loops for 25 rounds .44 Magnum and 12 rounds of 12 gauge

1

Smith & Wesson M29 .44 Magnum revolver, with leather belt holster and 50 rounds of ammunition

1

Marlin 1894 lever-action carbine, .44 Magnum caliber, with 30 rounds of ammunition and leather sling, OR

1

Remington 870 pump shotgun, with 6 round magazine, 30 rounds of 12 gauge buckshot, and leather sling

The contact pack is usually sized to a specific person on the team (never the team leader), usually the scout on a Recon team.

Of course, if found in a cache, sizing will be random, usually medium.

 

alternate contact pack - mass about 18 kg depending on weapon

1

baseball hat -- the packing crew tries to match it to the nearest MLB team

1

bandana neckerchiefs, one each red and blue

1

denim jacket

1

pair blue jeans

1

cotton flannel plaid work shirt

1

tee shirt, with artwork

1

pair hiking boots

1

leather money belt, can hold about 20 silver or gold coins at most (and will be notably heavy if picked up). Too narrow to hold a Project ID card, by the way.

1

pair heavy wool socks

1

nylon commercial hiking pack, containing 4 candles, 40 m twine, 6 cans of food, 3 boxer shorts, 3 pairs of heavy wool socks, 1 cotton flannel plaid work shirt, 1 tee-shirt with random artwork, 1 field dressing, Leatherman tool or equivalent, 12 ounce (0.35 liter) flask of scotch or brandy, other assorted toiletries, survival and personal items,

1

poncho and poncho liner

1

small pin-on brass compass

1

leather bandolier, with loops for 25 rounds .44 Magnum and 12 rounds of 12 gauge

1

knife with leather sheath. Knives vary, but are various bowie knives, Ka-Bar, camp knives, etc.

1

Smith & Wesson M29 .44 Magnum revolver, with leather belt holster and 50 rounds of ammunition

1

Marlin 1894 lever-action carbine, .44 Magnum caliber, with 30 rounds of ammunition and leather sling, OR

1

Remington 870 pump shotgun, with 6 round magazine, 30 rounds of 12 gauge buckshot, and leather sling

The contact pack is usually sized to a specific person on the team (never the team leader), usually the scout on a Recon team.

Of course, if found in a cache, sizing will be random, usually medium.

 

CVC Fragmentation Protective Undergarment

 

 

     A light kevlar vest, meant to be worn under the standard coverall; it was introduced into the U.S. military in 1981. The ballistic insert is made from 14 layers of kevlar. The purpose of this vest is to prevent injury from spalling of the vehicle's armor. Sizes are extra-small, small, medium, large, and extra-large, in short, regular and long lengths; it is designed to come down to about the belt line (since it's meant to be worn by seated vehicle crews). It's olive-drab in color, and fastened shut with velcro straps; weight about 1 kg depending on size.  

     Note that this vest is not given an NIJ armor rating, but at best it's level IIA.

 

Game effects:  armor value 6, covers locations 10, 11 and 12. If worn with the Resistweave coverall, combined armor value is 9.

 

CVC Helmet

 

 

     The U.S. military DH-132 combat vehicle crew helmet; it includes built-in headphones and the M-138/G microphone. The plugs on the end of the cables are for attaching to vehicle comm systems and to the Project member's personal radio. Comes in sizes small, medium or large. Mass, 2 kg.

     Prior to 1981, Project teams assigned to vehicles received the similar T56 CVC helmet. Most of those were replaced by the DH-132 during upgrades of cached equipment.

 

Game effects:  armor value 5, covers about half of the head -- in general, location 20.

 

Demolition Kit

 

demolition kit

  #

item

kg

1

plastic case with twelve M112 C-4 demolition blocks; case includes storage warning label.

7.5

2

M1 mechanical demolition timer/detonators

0.6

5

M2A1 demolition igniter/time fuse/detonators

0.3

1

roll primercord, 152 meters

5.0

1

15 meter coils of M700 time fuse

0.4

1

plastic box of twenty M7 blasting caps

0.1

5

M60 fuse igniters, in a sealed foil package

0.4

1

bronze cap crimping tool

0.5

1

canvas bag for everything except the cased demolition blocks

1.0

total

15.8

 

Doctor/Medic Equipment Set

 

 

 

     An olive drab nylon "tri-fold" bag with a shoulder strap (and attachment points to be carried on the suspender straps). It contains bandages, surgical and medical tools and consumables, minor drugs, a medical handbook/checklist/inventory list, the "Merck Manual of Diagnosis and Therapy, 14th Edition" (that's the 1982 edition; 2578 pages, 5.5" x 8", 1.2 kg - the 15th Edition came out in January 1987) and powdered blood volume expander (enough for 24 liters). Mass 11.3 kg.

    • I've decided to not have the players track all of the hundreds of items contained here. The contents cover 1980s-period equipment and consumables for:

      • airway and breathing

      • antibiotics and sterilization

      • bleeding and circulation

      • burns

      • chem-bio-radiation exposure

      • diseases

      • examination, diagnostic and symptoms

      • IV bags and accessories, plus blood volume expanders

      • fractures (it includes one bendable metal splint)

      • pain

      • thoracic trauma

    • one specific item:  a vial of eserine, the antidote for the effects of BZ gas. It's administered by intravenous injection; the vial has 20 doses.

       

Game effects:   a trained medic can use this bag to treat a very large number (not a whole town, though) of minor wounds;

20 major wounds; 4 maiming/amputation wounds; and 2 persons needing large amounts of IV fluids.

Note that "treating" a maiming/amputation wound for anything but stopping bleeding will call for Medicine skill.

 

The medic should decide how much pre-mixed blood volume expander they're carrying, at 1 kg per liter;

at most, this equipment set can hold 6 liters (presuming it's still otherwise got medicine and equipment).

Of course, you can store IV bags in other gear, also.

 

Drug Kit

 

     An olive drab nylon "tri-fold" bag with a shoulder strap (and attachment points to be carried on the suspender straps); the bag itself is identical to the doctor/medic kit externally except for markings. It contains various consumables and drugs and the means for administering them, an instructional manual, 6 reloads for the individual Med Kit, and powdered blood volume expander (enough to mix with 96 liters of pure water). Except for the Med Kit reloads, everything else is typical of 1980s emergency medical care. Mass 11.3 kg, which includes about a kilogram of the powdered blood expander. Most of the Med Kit reload drugs could, in theory, be used without actually having a Med Kit.

     An item for possible use/abuse:  a plastic bottle of 100 dextroamphetamine sulfate tablets (nickname"go-pills", more often known in the USA under the brand name Dexedrine). It's a stimulant, cognitive enhancer, aphrodisiac, and euphoriant, also used to treat obesity and narcolepsy; but the Project manual only advises its use as a stimulant. Each tablet has 5 milligrams of active ingredient.

 

Game effects:  a medic can use the contents of this bag to treat people for diseases and other non-traumatic conditions.

The bag has generically "20 doses of each major drug" and a very large supply (not enough for a town) of minor drugs.

The amount of "major drug doses" can be reduced to increase the number of treatments possible for major wounds,

maimings/amputations, and IV setups in a doctor/medic equipment set.

Note that the stimulant in the Med Kit is NOT an amphetamine.

Further note:  "every major drug" refers to the contents of a paramedic or combat medic's kit --

NOT everything in a pharmacy!

 

Emergency Rations

 

     A case of "lifeboat rations", containing 30 boxes, each box holds 12 bars (thus, 360 bars total in the case). The bars each contain 200 calories of food, and are made mostly from dates; the instructions on the bars say, "Eat one bar every 6 hours per person. Eat in small pieces." One bar is 0.04 kg; a case of 360 meals weighs 14 kg. 0.02 cubic meters.

    • The cases have packing dates dates between 1979 and 1987. "Inspect By" dates are five years after the packing date, but Project members were told these rations will last "much longer".

 

Field Dressing

 

 

     A regular issue item, both as "standard issue gear", in medical kits, and in vehicle first aid boxes. The actual style varies slightly depending on the date of manufacture, but generally they're a large, absorbent bandage, with an olive-drab back and two long tie-straps. As "issue gear", they come in an olive drab canvas pouch with two ALICE clips. Alone, the dressing weighs XX kilograms; complete with pouch, it weighs 0.1 kg.

 

Flotation Vest

 

     A life preserver vest, adult size, made from tan Resistweave, mass 1 kg. Suspenders or backpack straps can't comfortably be worn over the vest; wearing them under the vest is strongly discouraged (since that makes ditching your load very awkward).

    • It has an armor value of 9, whether worn over a Project coverall or not, and covers the chest (location 12) and two-thirds of the abdomen (locations 10 and 11).

 

Grenadier Vest

 

 

     A mesh vest with 24 pockets for holding 40mm grenades (or regular grenades of the smaller sizes, or other small objects). The four topmost pockets are oversized to hold the "longer" rounds (e.g., parachute flares). The vest is sized small, medium, large and extra large; weight 0.4 kg

 

Jerry Can

 

     Not a personal issue item, but they get carried. 20 liter capacity, weighs 4.3 kg empty, 24.3 kg full of water.

 

Jerry Can Cooler

 

 

     An insulated Resistweave® bag, with a wooden bottom and a sturdy shoulder strap, to carry a jerry can (or about 20 liters of other items). There is a heavy zipper around the top. Empty weight 7.3 kg, volume packed for storage 48 liters.

     The main use of this bag is for carrying medical supplies -- whole blood, for example.

 

KCB 70 bayonet

 

 

     The scabbard can be used with the blade as an insulated wire cutter (rated to 20,000 volts); a small hole in the grip contains a sight adjustment tool for the Stoner weapon system. The tip of the scabbard forms a wide-bladed screwdriver and a bottle opener; there's a tiedown strap on the scabbard. The knife has a sawback bowie-style blade, and can be mounted on M16-type rifles, Project-issued Low Maintenance Rifles, Stoner rifles and carbines, and the Uzi sub-machinegun. Weight 0.72 kg.

    • The black plastic scabbard and grips are (it turns out) a bit brittle and prone to cracking. After mid-1988 the KCB-77 was substituted; it's identical for game purposes, except the plastic scabbard and grip aren't prone to cracking, and the grip doesn't contain the sight adjustment tool.

 

Kel-Lite SKL Flashlight

 

this is the three-battery version, which is 26.5 cm long ...

 

... the two-battery version is 20.5 cm long

 

   Aluminum-bodied flashlight, powered by two or three D-cell batteries. As issued by the Morrow Project, they use rechargeable MP-AA batteries in sabot adapters. Weight 0.8 kg including batteries (3 D), or 0.6 kg including batteries (2 D). A spare incandescent bulb is stored in the tailcap.

 

Lensatic Compass

 

     Military compass with tritium-activated markings; equipped with lanyard.

    • The markings no longer glow in the dark by 2139

 

Load Bearing Equipment

 

magazine pouches with (L) a Stoner LMG 100-round tub, and (R) three magazines for M14 or M21 rifles.

 

     Usually abbreviated "LBE". Weight total is 1.2 kg, and consists of a web pistol belt (0.2 kg), Y-strap suspenders (0.4 kg). two rifle magazine pouches (0.25 kg each), and a compass/field dressing pouch (0.1 kg) clipped to the suspenders. The rifle magazine pouches each have two straps for safely carrying the smaller grenades (such as the M26A1 fragmentation grenade), and can hold:

    • a 100-round tub of linked Stoner ammunition

    • four 30-round Stoner magazines

    • three 20-round M14 magazines

    • about 25 shotgun shells

 

M25A1 Gas Mask

 

 

carrier bag not shown.

 

     The standard US Army combat vehicle crew protective mask, in carrier, with hose and M10A1 filter canister; the canister can plug into vehicle filter systems. Mask includes microphone to attach to CVC helmet. Mass, 2.83 kg including hose, canister, and carrier.

     A gas-proof hood is included, to be worn under the mask. The hood has various ties and pull-strings to snug it down; two loops are worn under the armpits, to keep the hood from coming loose.

 

M7 Bandoleer

 

     Also known as the claymore bag. Issued sometimes by the Project for carrying extra gear, and as a forage bag. Mass 0.2 kg. Some members get the ammunition carrying bag instead.

 

Meteorology Kit

 

meteorology kit


item 

kg

1

helium tank, 2 cubic meters capacity (enough for filling 12 weather balloons); 18 cm diameter, 1 m tall

12.0

1

helium tank regulator, hose, and nozzle

1.0

1

System Paulin precision barometer in a plastic case

2.0

12

folding reflectors

1.2

12

red cosmoprene weather balloons, will rise to about 20,000 m altitude, carry 1.6 kg; reliability POWx8%

2.4

6

balls of twine

0.6

2

note pads

 

1

olive drab green canvas hood with polarized viewing lens

0.2

1

wind-up stopwatch

 

1

rain gauge

 

1

folding yardstick

 

1

anemometer

 

1

sling psychrometer / thermometer

0.7

var

minor tools and supplies

 

1

sturdy green plastic case, measuring 1 meter x 0.6 meter x 0.25 meter (0.15 cubic meter)

2.0

total

30.0

 

Mini Mag-Lite Flashlight

 

   Aluminum-bodied black-anodized flashlight with a focusing beam, powered by two AA batteries. As issued by the Morrow Project, they use rechargeable MP-AA batteries. A spare incandescent bulb is stored in the tailcap. Weight 0.1 kg including batteries, length 14.6 cm. These became available in 1984, and thus some older teams may not have access to these (unless included in update packages after freezing).

 

Mountain Kit

 

mountain kit

  #

item 

kg

1

medium LC-1 pack, without frame

1.5

1

aluminum frame for LC-1 pack (highly recommended for loads over 20 kg on the pack straps)

1.9

2

36 meter coils of nylon 11mm climbing rope ("gold line", breaking strength 2800 kg)

6.3

1

folding grappling hook

2.3

20

rock pitons:  8 short (0.45 kg), 8 long (0.75 kg), 2 angle (0.20 kg) and 2 large angle (0.40 kg)

1.8

10

screw-lock carabiners

0.8

10

spring-gate carabiners (snap links)

0.7

1

pair of Jumar ascenders

0.4

2

figure eights

0.4

2

piton hammers (0.225 kg), with nylon shoulder slings and carabiner holes

0.5

2

pair crampons, each with neoprene-coated nylon bindings

1.6

2

ice axes, 74 cm long, with wrist straps and carabiner holes

2.0

1

rope pack with 122 meters of 8mm diameter nylon line (for use with XM1 grapnel)

5.4

1

XM1 rocket-assisted grapnel and M688 munition for 40mm launcher, in bandoleer

6.7

total

32.3

 

Pack Frame

 

 

     This is used to carry heavy loads -- it's highly recommended for loads over 20 kg on the pack straps. It has a waist belt and kidney pad, but is usually found without shoulder straps -- it is meant to assemble with the medium ALICE pack and uses the same shoulder straps. The PRC-70 radio can be easily strapped to the pack frame, for carrying on foot. It's made of green anodized aluminum, and comes with some accessories:  a shelf and two cargo straps. The frame is 31 cm wide, and 45 cm tall; with shelf, waist belt, and two cargo straps, it weighs 1.9 kg.

 

PASGT Helmet

 

 

     These were first introduced to the United States Army in 1983. Some MARS teams equipped after 1986 have these; it's also likely that some depots and other facilities stock them. The U.S. military was having trouble getting enough of them for all units, so it's not as if the Morrow Project could just whip up a million, either. It's made of kevlar fabric and phenolic resin, with a strap suspension system similar to the old M1 steel helmet. Nicknames include the kevlar, the K-pot, and the fritz. There are five sizes, from extra small to extra large; weight is about 1.6 kg for the medium size including suspension, cover, straps. The helmet itself is olive drab in color, but a fabric cover is issued; for the Project, the cover is black or white Resistweave™. An elastic band with two "cats eye" reflectors is wrapped around the cover.

 

game effects:  armor value 9, with or without the Resistweave cover ... though characters may not know that.

 

Personal Desert Kit

 

personal desert kit 

#

item

kg

1

olive drab boonie hat

0.1

1

GI sun/wind/dust goggles, with dark insert; provide laser safety and ballistic protection

0.2

6

pairs socks, grey wool

0.6

1 6 ounce can of sunburn cream

0.2

1

6 ounce can of SPF 30 sunblock

0.2

1

2 ounce bottle of CLP oil

0.1

1

water filtration unit, Katadyn or equivalent

0.7

2

bottles of iodine water-purifying tables (50 tablets per bottle)

0.1

1

solar still water condensing kit

1.0

1

(extra) plastic 1-liter canteen, filled, with insulated cover and metal canteen cup

1.4

1

folding entrenching tool and cover

1.4

1

signal mirror, stainless steel

--

1

desert survival manual

0.1

1

wool commando sweater, tan

0.8

1

cold weather hooded parka, sized small, medium or large, tan

1.9

1

10 ounce bottle of rubbing alcohol

0.3

1

bandanna, tan

--

1

collapsible 20 liter water carrier (weight is 21 kg when full)

1.0

total

12.0

 

Pocket Knife

 

 

     Camillus pocket knife (shackle, 1 blade, bottle and can opener, screwdriver, punch).

 

Ration Pack

 

Food!

Food Packet

Long Range Patrol

Escalloped Potatoes with Pork

Menu No. 6

Delta Packaging Products, Inc.

Bensenville, Ill.  60106

 

     A case of LRP ("long range patrol") freeze-dried rations; contains 5 boxes, 12 meals per box. There are eight different menus in any one case, but case contents and packaging differ as the years go by. The above image is a 1970s style.

 

a different package style from the mid-Eighties

 

     Some entree examples are beef hash, beef stew, sweet & sour pork, chicken a la king, lasagna, escalloped potatoes with pork (no. 6), spaghetti with meat sauce (no. 3), chicken with rice (no. 8), chili con carne, beef with rice. Each contains 1100 to 1500 calories of food -- an entree plus something like a granola bar, a candy or snack item (i.e., tootsie roll, life savers, etc.), a beverage mix (apple cider, lemonade, cocoa, orange beverage, lemon tea, or various flavors of 'kool-aid'), a brown plastic spoon, and an accessory pack (two packets of instant coffee, 6 grams of sugar, 4 grams of non-dairy creamer, a book of matches, candy-coated chewing gum (almost always Chiclets), salt, pepper, and toilet paper). The entrees can be eaten dry, but are much more appetizing when re-hydrated (and in fact shouldn't be eaten dry if you might become dehydrated). Re-hydration of the entree requires 0.3 liters of water. One meal is 0.35 kg; a case of 60 meals weighs 21 kg.

    • The cases have packing dates in the mid-Eighties when found with teams, and dates between 1979 and 1987 when found in caches. "Inspect By" dates are five years after the packing date, but Project members were told these items would last "much longer" -- at least ten years from when they were produced, but would be inedible after seventeen years.

    • Dehydrated rice or beans are especially unpleasant to eat.  

    • Somewhere, probably in depots, there may be the older LRP rations taken out of "frontline issue" when boltholes or caches were updated. These are about the same as the Eighties issue, but may contain 4 cigarettes if packed before 1976.

    • Note that modern (post-2000?) LRP rations are bigger (~0.5 kg each, about 1540 calories), and intended as a complete day's meal.

       

SCALP Set

 

     SCALP (suit, contamination avoidance, liquid protective):  polyethylene hooded jacket, trousers, and booties in sage green. Sizes are S, M, L, XL and XXL (although the sizes are all oversize to allow wearing over AUIB suits and other clothing). They are not intended to be re-used, cleaned or laundered, and in fact are usually "torn off" after about an hour's wear in the field. Comes in a sealed OD green semi-transparent plastic bag, with detailed instructions, about 21 cm long, 15 cm wide and otherwise "bulgy". Weight, 0.6 kg.

 

Sleeping Bag, Vacuum Packed

 

     Steel "sardine can" with keys; 34cm x 24cm x 13 cm; weight 3.6 kg. The bag itself is 2.2 meters long, down filled, without a zipper -- there's a drawstring at the top. They are reversible, olive drab on one side and white on the other.

    • These bags will not have survived well; the down fill degrades in the vacuum storage. The bags are rated for -34º C, but in the 22nd Century are really only good for -7º C.

 

Sun/Wind/Dust Goggles

 

     GI equipment since World War II, but gradually improved. By 1983, the lenses are 2mm polycarbonate, and can be swapped between clear, gray (sunglass), and brown (laser safety). They can stop a 1 gram projectile traveling at 167 meters per second (equivalent to a #8 birdshot pellet, which probably does 1d4 damage). Weight 0.2 kg.  

     The laser safety lenses will block about 95% of infrared light. Against the Mk 2 laser, the "eye safe" range is reduced to about a kilometer (where the beam is about 2 meters wide, and you will feel very hot if fired at -- it's a 40 kilowatt heat source, if nothing else. An adult human male will have about a square meter of surface exposed to the beam at that distance, and will feel more than 10 kilowatts of heat - more than a watt per square centimeter. Generating severe skin burns requires several watts per square centimeter -- thus the laser safety goggles will protect your eyes while the rest of you is getting very hot indeed. Rapid ignition of cellulose materials requires 40 watts of laser power per square centimeter.  

 

Game effects:  armor value 4.

 

Survey Sketching Set

 

     Equipment to perform basic survey sketching. A nylon bag contains a sketch board, waterproof covers, clear plastic covers, tripod, compass, alidade, hand level, pencils (wood and mechanical), erasers, triangles, rulers, thumbtacks, drafting tape, drafting equipment, lettering tool, solar-powered calculator, etc.  Complete set is 5 kg, 20 liters.

 

Survey Instrument Set

 

     Used for more detailed and precise surveying than the sketch set.  A wooden case contains three tripods with levels, a theodolite (8.2 kg including its own case), altimeter, manuals and reference binder, pocket drafting kit, a complete Survey Sketching Set, surveyor's slide rule, and hundreds of sheet of paper.  20 kg, 80 liters.

     While not included in this set, the GVS-5 laser rangefinder is often issued to Project survey teams; it can be mounted on any standard tripod.

 

Survival Axe

 

     A broad-bladed axe-machete-shovel, with an olive drab canvas sheath. Mass 0.7 kg, length 42 cm.

 

Game effects:  damage 1d6+1.

 

Survival Kits

 

     While not a standard issue item, the Project had a couple of standard "survival kits" available for members to place in their personal effects boxes (and for use in some specialized Project applications). They vary slightly over the years, but are usually based on various current US military kits. The kits are in resealable plastic bags, usually each 14 x 12 x 4 centimeters (each just wide enough to pack sideways in an M2A1 can), and each weighs 0.45 kg.

     One kits is more "medical", the other more "survival" stuff.

    • medical:  instruction card, aspirin, anti-diarrhea tablets, surgical tape, sunscreen, bacitracin eye ointment, elastic bandage, bandaids, unlubricated condoms, insect repellent, water purification tabletes, etc.

    • survival:  signal panel, signal mirror (with Morse code on the back), thread wapped around mirror, folding "surgical prep" razor, tweezer, clothes pins, mosquito headnet, tinder, fire-making bar, 1 liter water bag, wrist compass, candy, No-Doz, APC tablets, salt tablets, fishing line, fish hooks, fishing weights, whistle, space blanket, etc.

     The Project never quite got around to making them a required item for each team member, mostly due to lots and lots of time spent arguing about the best possible contents.

 

Survival Knife

 

     Usually called the "Air Force survival knife". It's 24 cm long, with a 12.7 cm parkerized sawback blade. It has a hefty butt cap for pounding on things, and comes in a plain leather sheath. Mass with sheath, 0.3 kg.

 

Survival Vest

 

     An olive-drab lightweight nomex vest; it has an adjustable harness, shoulder and leg straps, and an entrance zipper to secure the vest to the user. The sizes are medium and large. Pockets are intended for a "pencil" flare launcher and 6 flares, shackle knife, survival knife, PRC-68 radio with "rubber ducky" antenna, HP35 pistol and one spare magazine, two part survival kit, AA Mini-Maglite, lensatic compass, a small plastic canteen, and 1 box of emergency rations. There are a couple of small pockets not filled by the listed contents -- these are intended for maps and other mission-specific items.

     The radio, lensatic compass, shackle knife, pistol and magazine have to be provided by the user.

 

Team Cold Weather Gear

 

team cold weather gear

#

items

kg

vol, l

1

free-standing dome tent, 4-man, white

5

20

1

Optimus-type stove set

0.8

5

1

metal liter can of stove fuel, per 4 persons on the team

1

1

1

aluminum ice saw, 35 cm, with sheath

0.3

5

4

white/silver space blankets

--

--

1

cold weather weapons maintenance kit, including vehicle supplies

0.25

0.25

1

magnesium fire-stick fire starter

0.1

--

total

7.45

31

 

Team Desert Gear

 

team desert gear

#

item

kg

vol, l

1

4-man free-standing dome tent, tan

5

20

1

Optimus Svea 123R stove (mass 0.55 kg; includes 1 liter pot)

0.55

5

2

metal liter cans of naptha/white gas stove fuel (Optimus stove burns 7 hours per liter of fuel)

2

2

1

desert weapons maintenance kit, including vehicle supplies

0.25

2.5

2

desert fly open tent, 3 m by 6 m, tan canvas, with six aluminum poles

5

0.8

total

13

30

 

Tool Set, Squad Carpenters

 

     Supports four workers with tool belts, hammers, hatchets, hand saws, speed squares, pry bars, levels, chalk lines, utility knives, screw drivers, pliers, sanding blocks, measuring tapes, putty knives, pencils, rasps, staple guns, adjustable wrenches, etc. in a wooden transport chest. 100 kg, 660 liters

 

the squad carpenters' tool set

 

Tool Set, Company Carpenters

 

     Consists of carpentry hand, electric and battery-powered tools for a dozen workers. Complete set 443 kg, 2672 liters

 

    • case 1:  more hand tools, cordless drills, saws, etc.; along with blades, bits and other consumables; 110 kg, 546 liters

    • case 2:  components and consumables for case 1 ... pins, powder loads, fasteners, etc. ; 33 kg, 146 liters

    • case 3-5:  squad carpenter's tool sets; each is 100 kg, 660 liters

 

the company carpenters' tool kit

 

Tool Set, Construction Shop

 

     Five wooden cases, each case is about 100 kg, 546 liters; complete set 500 kg, 2730 liters

 

    • case 1:  12” double-bevel compound miter saw, 14" chop saw, keyless reciprocating saw, circular saw, clamps, cords, blades and consumables to support.

    • case 2:  2-horsepower router, jig saw kit, portable table saw, 3-1/4" planer, cords, blades and consumables to support.

    • case 3:  7-1/4" high-torque framing saw, 1-1/8" slotted-drive system hammer drill kit (mostly for masonry), 1/2" variable-speed reversible drill, hole saw, cords, bits, blades and consumables to support.

    • case 4:  200 psi compressor, 2 framing nailers, air hoses, cords and consumables to support.

    • case 5:  6" belt sander, 9" disc sander, 12" drill press, bits, cords, stands, safety equipment, blades and consumables to support.

 

Tool Set, Bridge Assembly

 

     The only tools required to assemble a Callender-Hamilton bridge.

 

 

prefab bridge tool kit

#

 item

kg

18

various large wrenches

100

8

hole-centering pins

40

15

bolt-driving extension heads

60

4

carrying tongs

7

2

carrying bars

8

2

blacksmith's sledge hammer

7

1

packing crate

25

total

247

 

Trade Pack

 

trade pack - mass 15 kg 

1

nylon Jansport pack

50

gold U.S. double eagle coins (weight 33.46 grams each) = 1.67 kg. Note these "Standing Liberty" double eagles all have 1933 dates, and are all counterfeits made by the Project.

50

silver U.S. dollar coins (weight 26.73 grams each) = 1.34 kg. These "Peace Dollar" coins are authentic, and have dates from 1921 to 1928.

6

roughly one-liter bottles of liquor (typically rum, vodka, whiskey, gin, brandy, bourbon ... all at least 80 proof)

1

can of tobacco

1

can of candy

6

sewing kits

4

mirrors

6

comb-and-brush sets

var.

toiletry articles

6

knives, assorted folding and fixed blade

var.

items of fishing gear (hooks, weights, nylon line, bobbers)

 

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