| 
  • If you are citizen of an European Union member nation, you may not use this service unless you are at least 16 years old.

  • Finally, you can manage your Google Docs, uploads, and email attachments (plus Dropbox and Slack files) in one convenient place. Claim a free account, and in less than 2 minutes, Dokkio (from the makers of PBworks) can automatically organize your content for you.

View
 

Pulp Submachineguns

Page history last edited by Michael 2 months, 3 weeks ago

back to the Index, or to the central Gun List

 

M1928 Thompson, Erma MPE, Lanchester, Soumi KP M/31

 

     Red text represents very generic or popular weapons. Italics represent guns not actually introduced yet by the current campaign date (1933).

 

submachineguns        

name

caliber

range

shots

damage

capacity

loading

malf

weight

cost

year

Beretta 1918/30

9mm Glisenti

20

burst

1d10

25

magazine

96

7

$150

1930

  • in service with Italian police agencies, and also sold to South American countries (in 9mm Parabellum). Reputation as unreliable.

Beretta M38A

9mm Parabellum

20

1 or burst

1d10

10, 20, 30, 40

magazine

98

9.3

~$150

1935

  • adopted in 1938 by the Italian military. It is designed to use powerfully-loaded ammunition. The usual issue is six 30-rd magazines and a chest-mounted carrier for five of them.

Bergmann M/20

7.65mm Parabellum

20

burst

1d10

50

magazine

98

9.3

~$200

1920

  • produced in Switzerland until 1927, in 9mm Parabellum (Finnish Civil Guard), 7.63mm Mauser (China and Japan) and other calibers. Usually issued with four magazines and a spare barrel. This is essentially a copy of the MP 18, and thus very similar to the MP 28 (q.v.)

Bergmann MP34

9mm Parabellum

20

1 or burst

1d10

24, 32

magazine

98

9.3

~$150

1934

  • minor sales to various military and police organizations, in various calibers (inc. .45 ACP). The MP35 is very similar, but uses MP28 magazines.

BH

7.62mm Tokarev

15

1 or burst

1d10

32

magazine

96

6.2

n/a

1942

  • a "home made" gun produced by the Polish Resistance, only a very few were ever made. Some also made in 9mm Parabellum. Loaded magazines weigh 1.5 lbs

Erma MP38

9mm Parabellum

20

burst

1d10

32

magazine

98

9.1

?

1938

  • adopted in 1938 for German panzer crews, and rapidly thereafter to the rest of their military

Erma MPE

9mm Parabellum

20

burst

1d10

32

magazine

98

9.1

~$180

1930

  • sold to Germany (as the MP34), Spain, and nations in the Balkans, Latin America and Asia. Earlier versions were available from the late 1920s. Also available in 7.63mm Mauser, or any other equivalent caliber.

Lanchester

9mm Parabellum

30

1 or burst

1d10

50

magazine

98

9

$70

1941

  • British copy of the MP 28/II. Sten guns (and the MP 28) use the same magazine dimensions, so the Lanchester can use 32 round Sten magazines.

MP 28/II

9mm Parabellum

30

1 or burst

1d10

20, 32, 50

magazine

98

9

$70

1928

  • German weapon -- also manufactured in Belgium as the Mitraillette Modele 34, and in Spain in 9mm Largo caliber; also sold to European, Latin American and Asian armies in various calibers; an expensive 50 round "snail" magazine is available for 9mm Parabellum guns. Derived from the older MP 18, and similar to the Bergmann M/20.

PPD-34

7.62 Tokarev

20

burst

1d10

25, 71

magazine

98

7.1

n/a

1934

  • mechanically a copy of the MP 28, produced in small numbers for security forces and border guards, unlikely to be seen before 1937. The 71 round drum magazine weighs 5.5 pounds loaded. Also used by China and Spain.

Soumi KP M/26

7.65mm Parabellum

20

burst

1d10

36

magazine

99

9

?

1925

  • produced in small numbers for the Finnish military, plus 5 for Estonia. It has an extremely curved magazine.

Soumi KP M/31

9mm Parabellum

30

burst

1d10

20/25, 50, 71

magazine

00

16

$300

1931

  • Finland's standard SMG; the 71 round drum weighs 5.5 lbs loaded, and were available from 1936. The 50 round magazine was available from 1940. Adopted in 1937 by Sweden, later by Denmark and Switzerland

Steyr-Solothurn SI-100

9mm Parabellum

20

burst

1d10

32

magazine

98

8.5

~$400

1931

  • of Swiss/German/Austrian origin, used by Austria, Hungary, and various Latin American and Asian countries. Other calibers available

Thompson M1928

45 ACP

20

burst

1d10+2

20, 50, 100

magazine

98

6

$225

1921

  • used by the US Navy and Marines (500 guns purchased, including those in shipboard armories), the Coast Guard, U.S Postal Service (250 guns, most of them transferred to the USMC by 1927), the NYPD (495 guns seized from an IRA shipment), the Soviet Union (several hundred purchased via Mexico in the 1920s, and used by politically-reliable units), Hollywood studios and prop houses (at least a hundred), a few other police departments and prisons, the Nationalist Chinese, company security forces (for uses during strikes), some Latin American nations, the IRA ... and gangsters. 20 round stick magazines cost $3 each; drum magazines are of 50 round capacity ($21 each), along with very rare, awkward (10 pounds loaded) and expensive ($30) 100 round drums, but change Malfunction to 96 or 95 respectively. A canvas magazine pouch for four 20 round magazines costs $5; a canvas case with shoulder sling for a drum magazine, $6. The manufacturer stopped selling these weapons to civilians in 1930, due to bad publicity; after that date, covert sales of untraceable weapons bring prices of up to $1000 each. 30 round magazines weren't introduced until December of 1941. The usual package for police included a fitted case, a 50 round drum magazine, and two 20 round "stick" magazines. BSA, in the United Kingdom, built a few under license, including some in 9mm Parabellum and 9mm Largo. The earlier M1921 model is mostly the same, but has a lighter bolt and a higher rate of fire.

 

Comments (0)

You don't have permission to comment on this page.