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Morrow Project Other Weapon Stats

Page history last edited by Michael 1 year, 5 months ago

back to the Index

 


Malfunction values are given in three steps, new/used/worn-out:

 

  • new:  as new, properly lubricated

  • used:  heavily used. Most 20th Century weapons that have been in-use for 150 years will be no better than this. Or:  using ammunition not made to 20th Century standards.

  • worn-out:  really beat up, probably rusty. Or:  using corroded ammunition, or ammunition over 50 years old.

 

Yellow tint is for weapons that might function marginally with black powder ammunition; red tint is for weapons which won't function with black powder ammunition. By "function" we mean cycle the action to reload a new cartridge -- the weapons might (or might not) be usable by manually working the action.

 

Automatic weapons can fire:

 

  • SB:  short burst, 3 rounds

  • B:  burst, usually 10 rounds fired

  • LB:  long burst, usually 30 rounds fired

  • VLB:  very long burst, 100 rounds fired

 

Firing on automatic is always a Major action.

 

Small Arms

 

     The gun lists for Pulp Adventure have many more pre-WW2 weapons.

 

Handguns

 

name

caliber

range

action

damage

pen

capacity

loading

malf

weight

zip pistol

38 Special

5 m

Major

1d8

5

1

not in combat

86/80/60

0.5 kg

  • found in various calibers

snub nose revolver

38 Special

10 m

Minor

1d8

5

5 or 6

swing out

00/00/96

0.5 kg

  • examples:  Detective Special, Chief's Special

ordinary revolver

38 Special

15 m

Minor

1d10

5

6

swing out

00/00/96

0.7 kg

  • examples:  Colt Police Positive, Colt Official Police, S&W Model 10, etc.

heavy revolver

45 Long Colt

15 m

Major

2d6+2

8

6

gate or swing

00/00/96

1 kg

  • examples:  Colt Frontier, Colt New Service

very heavy revolver

357 Magnum

15-20 m

Major

1d10+2

9

6

gate or swing

00/00/96

1 kg

  • also 45 ACP, 44 Special

super heavy revolver

44 Magnum

20 m

Major

2d6+2

8

5 or 6

gate or swing

00/00/96

1.3 kg

  • also 454 Casull (2d6+4 damage)

obrez

various

10 m

Major

2d6+1

8

1 +

various

97/81/76

1.5 kg

  • a sawed-down bolt-action rifle; damage and range are based on "full power military round", i.e., .30-06; capacity depends on original rifle design.

Beretta M92S

9mm

20 m

Minor

1d10

7

15

magazine

99/98/90

0.95 kg

  • a double-action semi-auto pistol, first available as the M92 in 1976; adopted as the M9 by the US military in 1985. Loaded magazines weigh 0.22 kg.

Bren Ten

10mm Auto

20 m

Major

2d6+2

7

12

magazine

99/96/80

1.1 kg

  • a double-action/single-action semi-auto pistol, produced from 1984 to 1987. Quite a reputation as a "tactical" design (especially the compact, dark finish "Special Forces" version), famously used for two seasons in Miami Vice. The safety can be applied when the weapon is cocked. Conversion kits allow conversion to .45 ACP. It was very difficult to obtain magazines -- many owners could only obtain one magazine for their pistol.

Colt M1911A1

45 ACP

20 m

Major

1d10+2

8

7

magazine

00/98/90

1.1 kg

  • standard US Army semi-auto single-action pistol; replacement with the Beretta M9 began in 1985. Loaded magazines weigh 0.25 kg.

Intratec TEC-9M

9mm

10 m

Minor

1d10

7

20, 36

magazine

98/96/75

0.95 kg

  • semi-auto blowback pistols, similar to a submachine gun. Using +P ammo or heavy bullets will damage the weapon. See the KG-9 in the submachine gun section below.

LAR Grizzly Mark 1

45 Win Mag

20 m

Major

2d6+4

8

7

magazine

00/98/90

1.4 kg

  • a large single-action M1911-style pistol, first offered in 1983. The manufacturer also offered conversions with different springs, barrels, small parts and magazines for .45 ACP, .357 Magnum, and 10mm Auto (X rounds). Very expensive:  if you get conversion kits, etc. you could easily spend $1000.

Para-Ordnance P14

45 ACP

20 m

Major

1d10+2

8

13

magazine

00/98/90

1.3 kg

  • only available from 1988 onwards, as magazines and a conversion kit (frame and some parts) for the single-action semi-auto M1911.

S&W Model 59

9mm

20 m

Minor

1d10

7

14 or 15

magazine

00/98/90

0.8 kg

  • first of the modern double-action high-capacity "wonder nines", with an aluminum alloy frame; made 1971-1982, and followed by the very similar Model 459. Loaded magazines weigh 0.2 kg. The pre-1979 14 round magazines give a Malfunction number of 99/98/00.

 

Shotguns

 

name

gauge

range

action

damage

pen

capacity

loading

malf

weight

slamfire shotgun

12

20 m

Major

4x1d6-1/2x1d6-1/1d6-1

6

1

single

90/80/50

3 kg

  • with a fixed firing pin and no trigger, these are about as simple as a cartridge weapon gets. Stats are for black powder ammunition, but some could probably handle smokeless powder ammunition. Using magnum ammunition, however, would make the gun dangerous and hard to handle. Versions for rifle and pistol ammunition also exist, but always have unrifled barrels. The malfunction number is for the best design; the most common malfunctions are a failure to fire, or difficulty in removing the empty shell from the weapon.

Federal shotgun

16

50 m

Major

2x1d6+1/1d6+1/1d4

6

4

clip

96/85/50

2 kg

  • 4 barrels with rotating firing pin. It's mostly made from cast zinc, with steel smoothbore 16" barrels. Ammo (#4 shot) is normally supplied in 4-round "moon clips", to be loaded in one Major action. In production at EBT since 2130. Shot damage decreases at 10, 20 and 50 meters.

 

Submachine Guns

 

name

caliber

range

action

damage

pen

capacity

loading

malf

weight

Sterling

9mm Para

40 m

Minor, B

1d10

7

10, 34

magazine

98/96/75

2.7 kg

  • the standard SMG of the British, Indian and Canadian armies, as well as some Commonwealth and other nations. It can use Sten gun magazines, as well as its own curved magazines; Sten guns cannot use Sterling magazines. It has a folding stock. There is a rare version with an integral silencer. Left-handed users should wear eye protection. The 10 round magazine is intended for tank crews.

KG-9

9mm Para

10 m

Minor, B

1d10

7

20, 36

magazine

91/75/41

1.1 kg

  • The KG-9, KG-99, TEC-9 are all similar to the TEC-9M (and there are a dozen other names); they have a polymer frame, which by the 22nd Century is getting brittle. These are typically pistols "workshop converted" to full-auto only, and were the "poster child" for cheap SMGs for street thugs in the 1980s. Malfunctions will typically be failures to feed or stovepipe jams; using +P ammunition or heavy bullets will damage the weapon. They don't have a shoulder stock.

Micro Uzi

9mm Para

15 m

Minor, LB

1d10

7

20+

magazine

98/96/75

2 kg

  • A small select-fire submachinegun, first imported to the U.S. in 1984. Range when firing burst is 8 meters; one-handed burst, 5 meters -- the rate of fire is 1700 RPM. The skill used is Handgun or Full Auto. The most common fumble is firing off the whole magazine due to shock or surprise. Note that all 9mm Uzi weapons use the same magazines, which are also used by the 9mm versions of the AR-15 rifle. Magazines exist in 20 round (0.45 kg loaded), 25 round (0.5 kg loaded), 32 round (the most common, 0.62 kg loaded), 40 round, and 50 rounds; 72 round drum conversions (from Suomi magazines) existed, but are super-rare. Most of them in the United States before the Atomic War were conversions from semi-auto Uzi Pistols; actual military Micro Uzis are full auto only.

Uzi

9mm Para

40 m

Minor, B

1d10

7

20+

magazine

99/96/85

2.65 kg

  • standard Israeli army weapon. Note that all 9mm Uzi weapons use the same magazines, which are also used by the 9mm versions of the AR-15 rifle. Magazines exist in 20 round (0.45 kg loaded), 25 round (0.5 kg loaded), 32 round (the most common, 0.62 kg loaded), 40 round, and 50 rounds; 72 round drum conversions (from Suomi magazines) existed, but are super-rare. Most Uzis in the United States before the Atomic War were conversions from semi-auto Uzi carbines.

M3A1

45 ACP

20 m

Minor, B

1d10+2

8

30

magazine

98/90/55

3.5 kg

  • the "grease gun"; standard US Army weapon since 1944, was still in use by tank crews in 1989. Loaded magazines weigh 1 kg. If your Full Auto skill is 40% or more, single shots can be fired (using Rifle skill, as a Minor action). The Federal machine carbine #1 is very similar.

 

Rifles

 

name

caliber

range

action

damage

pen

capacity

loading

malf

weight

Barrett M82

.50 cal

250 m

Major

4d6+1

17

10

magazine

98/96/75

13.5 kg

  • it has basic iron sights, but is normally fitted with a Leopold variable power telescopic sight (and a bipod). Penetration and range are for good condition 20th Century ball ammo; AP rounds will have penetration 21.

Cartel Rifle

10.4mm

50 m

Major

2D6+2

10

20

magazine

80/60/40

5 kg

  • semi-auto 21nd Century weapon. Some will fire full-auto (action B, malf 76). Cases are cut-down 7.62mm NATO. Introduced ~2050

Legion Rifle

7.62mm NATO

80 m

Major

2D6+4

12

20

magazine

94/76/60

5 kg

  • bolt-action rifle, uses detachable M14 magazines, usually converted from Ancient rifles. Working the bolt is a Minor action. Introduced circa 2080.

Styx Rifle

44 Styx

80 m

Major

3d6+4

10

5

internal

92/85/50

5 kg

  • bolt-action or lever-action rifles, close to .444 Marlin, can use .44 Magnum or .44 Special ammo. Some have tubular magazines, some have non-interchangeable box magazines. Working the bolt or lever is a Minor action. Introduced circa 2050.

AKM

7.62x39mm

90 m

Major, B

2d6+1

12

30

magazine

00/98/90

4 kg

  • standard Soviet rifle; the AK-47 is the same for game purposes, along with various Chinese, Yugoslavian, etc. copies

AK74

9.3x40mm

80 m

Major, B

2d6+1

9

30

magazine

98/90/60

4 kg

  • this represents the altered weapons being used by the DRA, which means they're about 160 years old; the Malfunction values already represent this.

AO-18

8.1mm AUT

90 m

Major, B

2d6+1

12

30

magazine

00/98/90

5 kg

  • a 22nd Century weapon employed ... elsewhere ...

Mauser

8mm Mauser

110 m

Major

2d6+4

12

5

internal

00/99/90

3.9 kg

  • any number of bolt-action military rifles from the late 19th Century to the Atomic War; the Kar98k is the version described here. The M1903 Springfield and Arisaka are very similar except for ammunition.

M14

7.62mm NATO

110 m

Major, B

2d6+4

12

20

magazine

99/98/85

4.1 kg

  • the standard U.S. Army rifle up to about 1967; note that the stats given are for using "iron" sights and regular ball (not match grade) ammunition. This rifle can use some accessories (bipod, silencer, etc.) for the M21 sniper weapon -- the telescopic sight of the M21 cannot be fitted to an M14 without altering the stripper clip guide and finding the correct mount. With M118 match grade ammunition this weapon has a range of 130 meters.

  • a match grade (accurized to M21 level, but without the scope fittings) M14 has a range of 120 meters, or 140 meters when using match grade ammunition. Malfunction values of match grade rifles are 00/98/85

M16

5.56mm NATO

90 m

Major, B

2d8

10

20, 30

magazine

98/87/40

4 kg

  • this covers most AR15, M16, M16A1 weapons. Most civilian models are semi-auto only, of course.

XM177

5.56mm NATO

70 m

Major, B

2d8

10

20, 30

magazine

98/87/40

5.4 lbs

  • various "shorty" M16 variants, also the Commando or GAU-5/A. Most civilian models (e.g., CAR-15) are semi-auto only, of course.

FN FAL

7.62mm NATO

110 m

Major, B

2d6+4

12

20, 30

magazine

99/98/85

4.25 kg

  • some are select-fire (such as the Canadian C2A1, stats as above); the Canadian C1A1 and the British L1A1 SLR are semi-auto only (no burst). The Canadian Army C2A1 is a heavy-barrel weapon which is issued with 30 round magazines.

C8 Rifle

7.62mm NATO

90 m

Major

2d6+4

12

20

magazine

99/98/85

4 kg

  • a 22nd Century weapon, based on the Sterling SMG design. Semi-auto only, can accept FAL bayonets and magazines.

Ruger Mini-14

5.56mm NATO

90 m

Major

2d8

10

5, 10, 20, 30

magazine

98/96/75

4 kg

  • a semi-auto 20th Century weapon. A select-fire version exists, the AC-556, sometimes with a folding stock. The magazines resemble, but are not interchangeable with, Stoner or M16 magazines. 

Winchester 1894

.30-30

90 - 110 m

Major

2d6

8

5 to 8

internal

99/98/85

3.1 kg

  • typical of lever-action game rifles in North America (including various Marlin weapons). Lower range and capacity for short carbines.

 

Machine Guns

 

name

caliber

range

action

damage

pen

capacity

loading

malf

weight

M60

7.62mm NATO

100 m

B

2d6+4

12

100

belt

97/80/40

10.5 kg

  • the standard US Army light machinegun since 1958. It uses M13 disintegrating link belt.

Federal machine gun

.30-06

100 m

B

2d6+4

12

250

belt

95/70/40

66 kg

  • weight listed includes tripod. Water cooled, feeds from cloth belt; loaded belt weighs 6.5 kg. In production since 2128.

PKM

7.62x54mmR

100 m

B

2d6+4

12

100

belt

98/90/60

7.5 kg

  • standard belt-fed weapon of the Soviet Union, and now the DRA.

 

Grenade Launchers

 

name

caliber

range

action

damage

pen

capacity

loading

malf

weight

M79

40x46

15 m

Major

var

var

1

single

99/95/60

2.7 kg

  • first weapon to use the standard 40mm grenades. The folding sight allows accurate fire at ranges up to 350 meters.

RPG-7

40mm rocket

25 m

Major

7d6

23

1

muzzle

98/96/75

7 kg

  • an anti-tank rocket launcher. It's fitted with a very basic sight, along with a much more useful telescopic sight. Nothing should be within 2 meters of the rear of the weapon, but it can be fired from within a building. The basic PG-7V rocket (2.6 kg) will penetrate 260mm of RHA steel. 

launcher

40x46mm

10 m

Major

var

var

1

single

99/90/60

4 kg

  • crude, smoothbore break-open launchers, roughly resembling an M79. If rifled, range is 15 meters; if no long-range sight is fitted, the Aim action only adds 10% to the chance to hit. Reloading requires a Minor and Major action.

2 inch Styx launcher

50mm

15 m

Major

var

var

3+1

internal

91/80/50

6 kg

  • smooth-bore lever-action grenade launcher. A tube below the barrel holds eight .45-70 blank rounds; a further tube behind the "breech" hold three 50mm projectiles. The buttpad is at the rear of the projectile magazine tube. When the lever is worked, one 50mm projectile moves forward into the barrel, and a .45-70 blank round is brought up and chambered behind the projectile. The fin-stabilized rounds weigh 0.5 kg each. Reloading the weapon requires two Major actions for each projectile inserted into the magazine, and a Minor action for each blank round inserted into the smaller magazine; working the lever is only a Minor action. Maximum range is 120 meters.

  • projectiles seen include smoke, explosive (with a time delay fuze) and shaped charge rounds which can penetrate 50 millimeters of steel armor. The shaped charge round must strike within about 20 degrees of "straight on" for the mechanical fuze to function.

 

Cap-and-Ball Handguns

 

name

caliber

range

action

damage

pen

capacity

loading

malf

weight

large revolver

.44

15 m

Major

2d6+2

5

6

cap and ball

98/96/90

3 lbs

  • more or less similar to Civil War army revolvers. Reloading is slow enough that it won't happen during combat rounds.

revolver

.36 or .38

10 m

Major

1d8

4

6

cap and ball

98/96/90

2 lbs

  • more or less similar to Civil War army revolvers. Reloading is slow enough that it won't happen during combat rounds.

 

Cap-and-Ball Longarms

 

name

caliber

range

action

damage

pen

capacity

loading

malf

weight

rifle

.45, .50, .58

60 m

Major

1d10+4

~8

1

cap and ball

95/85/50

10 lbs

  • more or less similar to Civil War Springfield rifles, firing Minie bullets. A well-trained user with prepared paper cartridges can reload as Minor-Major-Minor actions, in that order. Flintlock versions add another Major action. In .50 caliber, damage is 1d10+3; in .45 caliber, damage is 1d10+2.

musket

.75

40 m

Major

1d10+4

~8

1

cap and ball

95/85/50

10 lbs

  • smoothbore, fairly long. Actual balls can be as small as 0.69". A well-trained user with prepared paper cartridges can reload as Minor-Major-Minor actions, in that order. Flintlock versions add another Major action.

 

Bows

 

name

STR Min

DEX Min

range

damage

reload

weight

short bow

9

11

40 m

1d6

Minor

0.4 kg

  • Uses short bow arrows.

long bow

14

11

80 m

1d8+2

Minor

0.7 kg

  • Uses long bow arrows. These are most often actually "flat bows", made from ash, birch or maple, about 2 meters long

heavy long bow (warbow)

17

11

100 m

1d10+1

Minor

1 kg

  • Uses long bow arrows. Made from wood or old springs about 2 meters long; the wooden ones are often actually "flat bows"

light cross bow

7

9

100 m

2d4+2

Major

1 kg

  • Typically drawn with hand lever. Uses bolts.

heavy cross bow

11

9

120 m

2d6+2

2x Major

1 kg

  • Typically drawn with foot stirrup. Uses bolts.

 

  • Short bow arrows are about 50 cm long; a sheaf of 24 arrows weighs about 0.5 kilogram.

  • Long bow arrows have a 69 cm shaft, with up to 10 cm of metal arrowhead; a sheaf of 24 arrows weighs about 1 kilogram.

  • Cross bow bolts are about 35 cm long; 24 of them weigh about 2 kilograms.

  • Remember that arrows and quarrels halve the armor value of flexible armor.

  • Broadhead arrows or quarrels (typical of hunting projectiles) won't go through more than 2 points of armor (after adjustment for armor material type). They are treated as Slashing weapons for purposes of Special hit results and blood loss.

     

Melee Weapons

 

     See the Haerth weapons list in general. Note that the maximum armor that can be penetrated by melee weapons is equal to their normal maximum damage (e.g., no Damage Bonus). Remember that the Armor Value of "soft armor" is halved against some weapons (typically, the pointy, impaling melee kind).

 

  • Example:  a battle axe does 1d8+2 damage; it thus cannot penetrate more than 10 points of armor, no matter how much damage is rolled.

  • Example:  a dagger does 1d4+2, with a maximum penetration of 6 points. A Resistweave coverall usually has a 7 point Armor Value; but against daggers (an impaling-type weapon), it only has a 4 point Armor Value, and can thus be penetrated (if the dagger user rolls more than 4 points of damage).

 

Artillery

 

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